Botany

Micrasterias
fimbriata

BA410

PlanFluar 10x

Moticam 10
Botany

Crystals in
Larix decidua

BA410E

PlanApo 40x
pol. lam.

Moticam 10 stack
Zoology

Parnassius apollo
part of wing

BA310E

PlanApo 20x

Moticam 10 stack
Histology

Femur cross
section

BA310E

PlanApo 20x

Moticam 10
Pathology

Haemolysis
streptococcus
sepsis

BA410

PlanAchro 100x o.i.

Moticam 5
Microbiology

Onion mitosis

BA410 

PlanAchro 60x

Moticam 5
Zoology

Barnacle on
mussel

SMZ-171

Stereo

Moticam 10 stack
General

Tumbled gems

SMZ-171

Stereo

Moticam 10 stack
Pathology

Eimeria stiedae
in liver

BA410 
PlanFluar 20x

Moticam 10
Microbiology

Penicillium with
conidiophores

BA310E

PlanApo

Moticam 10
Histology

Artery

BA410

PlanAchro 10X

Moticam 5
General

Urea crystals

BA410

PlanFluar 20x
pol lam

Moticam 10

Bronze rot in a Carolingian disk fibula (800 AC) found near Maastricht

  • 23bronze rot SMZ171Mot5stk
  • 1Fibula
  • 3Fibula bronze rot SMZ171Mot5stk
This  disc  fibula  with  animal  motif  is  made  of  copper  alloy  and  is  inlaid  with  glass  paste. The metal exhibits severe corrosion and is brittle. Saccharification has occurred in the glass paste and bronze rot is present. Bronze rot usually is already well present before it reveals itself to the surface. Bronze rot or bronze disease is recognizable by the appearance of bright green dots and bumps that come out to the surface. Because of bronze rot, the material pulverizes, distortions, bumps and pits occur on the surface. To stabilize bronze rot, the object is immersed in  benzotriazole.  This  should  be  done  under  vacuum.  Given  the  relatively  high  cost  of restoration, this disc fibula is only treated with an acid-free Vaseline, which is a cheap, but a much less effective treatment.

Source: Jean-Paul Geusen, Thorn, The Netherlands


Prehistoric nail imprints

  • 2Nailprint prehistoric SMZ171Mot5stk
  • 1prehistoric potsherd
On the images, a hand formed pottery fragment from the Michelsberg culture, Middle Neolithic period(4300 - 3500 BC) is shown. The Michelsberg culture is responsible for some of the oldest types of  pottery  in  Europe,  which  is  seen  as  a  typical  element of  this  culture.  This  pottery  is generally found on hilltops, giving the impression of the presence of former fortified settlements. This  impression  is  reinforced  by  findings  of  many  waste  pits with  very  different  content  and interruptions in the trenches that are interpreted as gates. ‘Hand formed’ pottery means here that it was not wheel-made, but that it was built up out of clay rolls  or  slabs.  This  type of  pottery  is  sober and even  not decorated at  all.  It  is  gray-brown  in color,  with a  coarse  structure.  The  clay  has been  emaciated  by  the  addition  of  coarse  quartz grains and it was soft-baked. Emaciation is a term for the addition of ingredients to the potter's clay in order to prevent shrinkage and cracking during the baking process. On this prehistoric potsherd nail imprints originating from the maker can be seen. It was found during an archeological field survey in the neighborhood of Maastricht in The Netherlands.

Source: Jean-Paul Geusen, Thorn, The Netherlands