Botany

Micrasterias
fimbriata

BA410

PlanFluar 10x

Moticam 10
Botany

Crystals in
Larix decidua

BA410E

PlanApo 40x
pol. lam.

Moticam 10 stack
Zoology

Parnassius apollo
part of wing

BA310E

PlanApo 20x

Moticam 10 stack
Histology

Femur cross
section

BA310E

PlanApo 20x

Moticam 10
Pathology

Haemolysis
streptococcus
sepsis

BA410

PlanAchro 100x o.i.

Moticam 5
Microbiology

Onion mitosis

BA410 

PlanAchro 60x

Moticam 5
Zoology

Barnacle on
mussel

SMZ-171

Stereo

Moticam 10 stack
General

Tumbled gems

SMZ-171

Stereo

Moticam 10 stack
Pathology

Eimeria stiedae
in liver

BA410 
PlanFluar 20x

Moticam 10
Microbiology

Penicillium with
conidiophores

BA310E

PlanApo

Moticam 10
Histology

Artery

BA410

PlanAchro 10X

Moticam 5
General

Urea crystals

BA410

PlanFluar 20x
pol lam

Moticam 10
‘The Dutch live with water’
  • Micrasterias rotata cell division 1 20x
  • b Micrasterias papillifera 20x
  • Micrasterias rotata cell division 2 20x
  • Micrasterias rotata cell division 3 20x
  • Micrasterias rotata 40x
  • a Micrasterias rotata and papillifera 10x

‘The Dutch live with water’
The Dutch have to live with water, because of their country lying below sea level for the greatest part. What does this have to do with microscopy?

Every year the Dutch are spending billions of euros in dikes, canals, rivers, bridges, locks, waste water purification, water quality monitoring, water research and innovation. Dutch water know how is being applied all over the world.

A major activity is the continues monitoring of the state of the zoo- and phytoplankton in rivers, streams and other aquatic areas, in order to watch over the quality of water, its flora and fauna. Besides chemical analyzes of water, monitoring the state of phytoplankton such as diatoms, cyanobacteria, desmids etc. is an extensive activity carried out by various laboratories spread all over the country.

(Inverted) microscopy plays a major role here. With the aid of this instrument phytoplankton can be studied, species identified and counted in a convenient, quick and standardized way. In spite of the fact that this often involves routine work, sometimes unknown and interesting things are brought to light. One can also enjoy the beautiful images if, for example, ornamental algae (Desmids) are under the microscope. In the pictures shown here, one can see an example of some Desmids and the cell division of Micrasterias rotata. In the Netherlands there is a separate organization that deals with Desmids. One of the most important publications in this area is Desmids of the Lowlands by Peter F.M. Coesel and Koos (J.) Meesters, with the connected website www.desmids.nl

Euglenophyta
  • Euglena acus eye flagellate

These organisms are unicellular and live in fresh water. Some of these organisms arephotosynthetic, producing their own food, while others are heterotrophic, eating small organisms. 

Euglena acus
The Euglena (genus) acus  (species) is a type of Protista which lives in fresh water ponds during warm seasons. The Euglena acus produces its food through photosynthesis, but  some also feed on small particle-like organisms.

 Interesting facts about Euglena acus:
*Euglena acus comes from the Greek words eu glene, meaning "good eye" referring to its eyespot.
*This eyespot permits the Euglena acus to move or head toward or away from light.
*Euglena acus often form a green film on the surface of ponds and drainage ditches.
*The Euglena acus uses its flagellum to move by pulling the body through the water.
*By changing its shape, the Euglena acus can easily maneuver through tight spaces.
 


 

The Xanthidium armatum ‘inverted’
  • xanthidiu

The  use  of  an  inverted  microscope  for  observation  of  phytoplankton,  actually  belongs  to  the standard. The image which is shown here, has been taken with the Motic Inverted Microscope AE31E.  A  35  mm  cell  culture  petri  dish  with  a  high  precision  glass  bottom  was  used. This combination has some advantages over the use of an upright microscope:
*A big sample quantity of some milliliters can be investigated in a single operation, which saves quite some time.
*Desmids can be presented in a ‘not squeezed’ form. The cover glass normally used under an upright microscope, can cause loss of detail because of squeezing.
*The use of petri dishes with a high precision glass bottom, enables the use of high quality objectives (even oil immersion) with high N.A.’s, their small working distance not being an obstacle then
*When working according to the Utermöhl method, cells sink to the bottom of the dish. The distance from the objective to the desmid is minimal, so that the theoretically achievable image quality can be approached.

Xanthidium armatum is a conspicuous desmid that is readily to be recognized. In frontal view, semicells  are  about  octangular  in  outline  and  marked  by stouttrifurcate  ,  bi-or  spines  on  the angles.  The  semicell  center  is  somewhat  inflated  and  furnished  with  a  corona  of  simple  or bifurcate teeth. In the Netherlands, X. armatum is confined to oligotrophic habitats where there is  a  slight  input  of  minerals  from  the  subsoil.  As  a  consequence  of  the  highly  acidified precipitation in the last century its occurrence is much decreased. Today it is a rare species. Source of the last paragraph: www.desmids.nl